TVPaint/Animation Ramblings
Hello there! So i am very new at TVPaint and I'm very thankful for this blog here! I'm trying to export a short walk cycle gif, but whenever I try to upload it, it looks really choppy. I turned it into a TIFF and now i see that when its exporting it, it cuts out like a bunch of frames. I've already tried making it smaller in size, but it doesnt work. Any advice?

Hm, I’m not sure what could be causing that!  I use these options and they have always worked for me:

When I’m uploading a gif though I always bring it into Photoshop for adjustments and mostly to bring the filesize down to an uploadable size haha.  But messing with the framerate in PS is tricky, if you’re doin that then I can try and help you out further!  Otherwise I hope you find your answer here! c:

I need serious help understanding the mutiplane FX, ive figured out the general camera movement, but im lost on multiplane and cant find a tutorial anywhere. Hoping you can help with resources.

I honestly never use the multiplane camera in TVPaint; I understand it’s gotten better in more recent versions but unfortunately I use 8.5 which doesn’t have the most quality camera options.  I find it so much easier to just import everything into After Effects and make camera moves in there but I realize not everyone has access to AE, so I’ll just point you to the best tutorial I know which is just the user manuel! http://www.tvpaint.com/v2/content/article/downloads/manual.php I’m pretty sure what you need is explained in there somewhere.  Sorry I can’t be more help.

Animating on 2's would be to keep the drawings exposed for 2 frames according to Eric Goldberg and other 2d animation teachers. But according Richard Williams, animator survival kit he says something like animating on 2s or 14s would be to have 14 drawings. You thoughts.?

Gonna be honest here and say that I don’t actually own that book so I can’t look up what you’re referencing, but yes animating on twos means exactly what you said.  There are 24 frames in a second for traditional animation and animating on twos means that there are 12 drawings for each second.  Not sure where the number 14 comes in!

anatomicalart:

Quickest way to improvement? Practice. It’s a simple bit of advice that rings with absolute truth. Articles, tips, mentors, and study will never get you as far as rolling up your sleeves and getting down to work, be it animation or any other skill. Today we’ve compiled a list of exercises, like animation push-ups, that will get your art skills buff and toned.
Maybe you still need convinced of how important the “Art of Doing” is? Look no further than the early days of animation, especially at the Disney studio. Here were a group of animators (before being an animator was even a thing) who HAD no books to read, or websites to visit, or even experienced animators to ask. They learned via the age old art of hands-on training, experimenting and discovering as they went. And some would argue they created some of the greatest animation to ever be seen. Masterpieces like the dwarfs dancing in Snow White or the terror of the Monstro scene in Pinocchio. So be like them! Get out there and do animation!

Some of these exercises you may have done or seen before; some maybe not. Consider doing each of them, even if you did once previously, because returning to an old exercise to see how much you’ve progressed is a very valuable experience.
Level 1 Exercises
(Do not discount their simplicity! Here you have the principals of animation, which all other animation is built on. They are worth your time and effort.)
Ball Bouncing in place, no decay (loop)
Ball Bouncing across the screen
Brick falling from a shelf onto the ground
Simple character head turn
Character head turn with anticipation
Character blinking
Character thinking [tougher than it sounds!]
Flour Sack waving (loop)
Flour Sack jumping
Flour Sack falling (loop or hitting the ground)
Flour Sack kicking a ball
Level 2 Exercises
Change in Character emotion (happy to sad, sad to angry, etc.)
Character jumping over a gap
Standing up (from a chair)
Walk Cycle [oldie but goodie!]
Character on a pogo stick (loop)
Laughing
Sneezing
Reaching for an object on a shelf overhead
Quick motion smear/blur
Taking a deep breath [also tougher than it sounds!]
A tree falling
Character being hit by something simple (ball, brick, book)
Run Cycle
Level 3 Exercises
Close up of open hand closing into fist
Close up of hand picking up a small object
Character lifting a heavy object (with purpose!)
Overlapping action (puffy hair, floppy ears, tail)
Character painting
Hammering a nail
Stirring a soup pot and tasting from a spoon
Character blowing up a balloon
Character juggling (loop)
Scared character peering around a corner
Zipping up a jacket
Licking and sealing an envelope
Standing up (from the ground)
Pressing an elevator button and waiting for it
Starting to say something but unsure of how
Level 4 Exercises
Character eating a cupcake
Object falling into a body of water
Two characters playing tug-of-war
Character dealing a deck of cards out
The full process of brushing one’s teeth
A single piece of paper dropping through the air
Run across screen with change in direction
Sleeping character startled by alarm then returning to sleepy state
Opening a cupboard and removing something inside
Putting on a pair of pants
Opening the “world’s best gift” and reacting
Any of the above exercises using a very heavy character/object next to a very light character/object. Enhance the differences the weight change makes!
Things to keep in mind:
Reading these exercises will do as much for you as reading about push-ups would do for your physical muscles: NOTHING. If you want the benefit, you must animate them. Take a deep breath and just do it.
Do not forget the famous words of Ollie Johnston: “You’re not supposed to animate drawings [3D models]. You’re supposed to animate feelings.” If a character isn’t thinking, they aren’t alive, and the animation has failed.
Keep it simple! There is no reason to over complicate any of these exercises. Going back to push-ups, would push-ups be harder if while doing them you also recited the Gettysburg Address? Yes. Would they be any more beneficial? No. Keep things nice and simple and clear.
Do your best. There is no reason to do these exercises poorly. Give it your all. You don’t have to show anyone, these are for you. You owe it to yourself to try your very best. Something not quite right? Take the time to fix it.
As always, have fun. Push ups are not fun. Animation is supposed to be. Be joyful in your work!
Have any questions about the exercises above? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer them the best we can! Someone else may be wondering the exact same thing, so you’ll help them too. Likewise if someone is looking for possible exercises, why not share a link to these and give them a hand?

Article featured on AnimatorIsland.com [Source]Article composed by J.K. RIKIMARCH 18, 2013Follow @AnimatorIsland on Twitter for more updates tips and tricks.

anatomicalart:

Quickest way to improvement? Practice. It’s a simple bit of advice that rings with absolute truth. Articles, tips, mentors, and study will never get you as far as rolling up your sleeves and getting down to work, be it animation or any other skill. Today we’ve compiled a list of exercises, like animation push-ups, that will get your art skills buff and toned.

Maybe you still need convinced of how important the “Art of Doing” is? Look no further than the early days of animation, especially at the Disney studio. Here were a group of animators (before being an animator was even a thing) who HAD no books to read, or websites to visit, or even experienced animators to ask. They learned via the age old art of hands-on training, experimenting and discovering as they went. And some would argue they created some of the greatest animation to ever be seen. Masterpieces like the dwarfs dancing in Snow White or the terror of the Monstro scene in Pinocchio. So be like them! Get out there and do animation!

image

Some of these exercises you may have done or seen before; some maybe not. Consider doing each of them, even if you did once previously, because returning to an old exercise to see how much you’ve progressed is a very valuable experience.

Level 1 Exercises

(Do not discount their simplicity! Here you have the principals of animation, which all other animation is built on. They are worth your time and effort.)

  1. Ball Bouncing in place, no decay (loop)
  2. Ball Bouncing across the screen
  3. Brick falling from a shelf onto the ground
  4. Simple character head turn
  5. Character head turn with anticipation
  6. Character blinking
  7. Character thinking [tougher than it sounds!]
  8. Flour Sack waving (loop)
  9. Flour Sack jumping
  10. Flour Sack falling (loop or hitting the ground)
  11. Flour Sack kicking a ball
Level 2 Exercises
  1. Change in Character emotion (happy to sad, sad to angry, etc.)
  2. Character jumping over a gap
  3. Standing up (from a chair)
  4. Walk Cycle [oldie but goodie!]
  5. Character on a pogo stick (loop)
  6. Laughing
  7. Sneezing
  8. Reaching for an object on a shelf overhead
  9. Quick motion smear/blur
  10. Taking a deep breath [also tougher than it sounds!]
  11. A tree falling
  12. Character being hit by something simple (ball, brick, book)
  13. Run Cycle
Level 3 Exercises
  1. Close up of open hand closing into fist
  2. Close up of hand picking up a small object
  3. Character lifting a heavy object (with purpose!)
  4. Overlapping action (puffy hair, floppy ears, tail)
  5. Character painting
  6. Hammering a nail
  7. Stirring a soup pot and tasting from a spoon
  8. Character blowing up a balloon
  9. Character juggling (loop)
  10. Scared character peering around a corner
  11. Zipping up a jacket
  12. Licking and sealing an envelope
  13. Standing up (from the ground)
  14. Pressing an elevator button and waiting for it
  15. Starting to say something but unsure of how
Level 4 Exercises
  1. Character eating a cupcake
  2. Object falling into a body of water
  3. Two characters playing tug-of-war
  4. Character dealing a deck of cards out
  5. The full process of brushing one’s teeth
  6. A single piece of paper dropping through the air
  7. Run across screen with change in direction
  8. Sleeping character startled by alarm then returning to sleepy state
  9. Opening a cupboard and removing something inside
  10. Putting on a pair of pants
  11. Opening the “world’s best gift” and reacting
  12. Any of the above exercises using a very heavy character/object next to a very light character/object. Enhance the differences the weight change makes!
Things to keep in mind:
  • Reading these exercises will do as much for you as reading about push-ups would do for your physical muscles: NOTHING. If you want the benefit, you must animate them. Take a deep breath and just do it.
  • Do not forget the famous words of Ollie Johnston: “You’re not supposed to animate drawings [3D models]. You’re supposed to animate feelings.” If a character isn’t thinking, they aren’t alive, and the animation has failed.
  • Keep it simple! There is no reason to over complicate any of these exercises. Going back to push-ups, would push-ups be harder if while doing them you also recited the Gettysburg Address? Yes. Would they be any more beneficial? No. Keep things nice and simple and clear.
  • Do your best. There is no reason to do these exercises poorly. Give it your all. You don’t have to show anyone, these are for you. You owe it to yourself to try your very best. Something not quite right? Take the time to fix it.
  • As always, have fun. Push ups are not fun. Animation is supposed to be. Be joyful in your work!

Have any questions about the exercises above? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer them the best we can! Someone else may be wondering the exact same thing, so you’ll help them too. Likewise if someone is looking for possible exercises, why not share a link to these and give them a hand?

Article featured on AnimatorIsland.com 
[Source]
Article composed by J.K. RIKI
MARCH 18, 2013
Follow @AnimatorIsland on Twitter for more updates tips and tricks.

Hi, sorry to ask but I'd like to know, is it possible to audio scrub in TVPaint?
Anonymous

Yep!  Once you load the sound you should be able to see the soundwaves at the bottom of your timeline and you’ll be able to hear each frame as you scrub through your animation.

Hey, when your using software to do your animations do you do the, roughs as constructions, like in basic shapes or gesture drawings.

A little of both!  It’s important when you’re first getting into animation to learn the basics and get a feel for timing and spacing through basic construction shapes, then adding details on top of that later.  When you do rough gestures instead of basic shapes, it’s a lot easier to lose volume or go off model.  But for me, I need to get a bit of a gesture in there to carve out the emotion and motivation of the character I’m working on. Like, don’t just have a character jump, have a beat of them look up to where they’re about to jump to!  Get some emotion in there, like maybe they’re nervous or super confident or whatever.  That sorta stuff I like to build into my roughs.

It’s easy to get lost in the details but you also need to get some strong main poses in there too.  So yeah for me, I do a mixture of both.  I get the main poses figured out as roughly defined gestures and everything inbetween is a huge mess of the biggest masses figuring their way around getting to those poses with as much weight as I can give em.

That’s just me though haha, lots of people may disagree and be all CONSTRUCTION SHAPES ALL THE WAY, simplifyyyy.  And then there’s the 3D people who just spline right form the start like, how do you even do that???? But people make amazing animation that way, so!!  That’s why practice is so important, you have to find what works for you.

I hope that answered your question?

Hey again, I'm sorry to keep bothering you, I'm just a little confused at the moment. I think this program is beginning to make more sense now, the more I'm using it, but I think I'm misunderstanding something fundamental, and it's causing confusion.. I'm making an animatic to a soundtrack. I've been using the little tab within the Project view called "Select Timeline View" to move the clips to the music.But then I found out that each Project clip can actually have animations inside of them, so

(cont’d)

I started to do that. And now I’m realizing that when I change the duration of clips within each scene, It changes how long the scene holds in the Timeline view. How do I time the animations within each scene to the music? Because it looks like I can only time the animatic to music in the project timeline view. There’s no sound once I click into the individual clips, preventing me from accurately timing things. Maybe my workflow is too complicated than it needs to be?

It sounds to me like this is a feature of the newer versions of TVPaint which I am unfortunately not familiar with!  So I don’t know how to go about any kind of workflow using it…  The version I use doesn’t have an option to make little scenes within one big project.  The way I do it without it is I just make one big animatic, then splice it up and create a new file for each separate scene with the imported animatic scene and section of sound and work on em like that.  I’m sure there’s a way to do it easier but I’m afraid I can’t be much help here!

I know you said it doesn’t play the sound within the scenes but can you put new sound in?  Once the animatic is all timed out maybe you can splice up your sound file and put it in each scene?

Hey, thanks for answering my questions! Also, I read somewhere that it's easier to press "z" on the keyboard and drag out your stylus up and down to change the size while watching it change( what I was looking for) If you don't mind though, would you make something clear for me? Is it impossible to just select something and free transform it, like in Photoshop? because I know you mentioned something about transforming earlier but it seemed like such a long process.

Yeah, I think I heard someone say there’s a free transform tool in newer versions of TVPaint, which is GREAT, but my version doesn’t have that haha.  The way I go about it is described here: http://tvpaintanimation.tumblr.com/post/14888081537/hiyo-this-blog-made-me-wanna-give-tvpaint-a-try-but-i

How do you change the brush size of the sketch pencil? The interface isn't too obvious with little things like that...

Right there where it says size

Hey I'm wondering you know if there any key maps the resemble the shortcuts used in flash? I'm used to that workflow and I'm sure would help me a lot since I been using flash for almost a decade.

Hm!  I’m not able to find anything, I think your best bet is just going in and creating the shortcuts yourself to your liking.  Haha it’s definitely a bit of a learning curve transferring from Flash to TVP so if you can’t figure out how to set up certain workflows, I can try and help you out there!